Wednesday, August 15, 2012

PQ moves into majority territory

One province-wide poll and three riding polls have been released since the last update, and for the first time in the campaign they put the Parti Québécois in a position to form a slim majority government.

With a gain of 1.6 points, the Parti Québécois is now projected to take 36.1% of the vote, giving them 65 seats. That is a gain of seven since the last update and just enough to put them over the barrier of 63 seats that is needed for a majority government.

The Liberals have suffered most at the hands of the PQ, slipping five seats to 42 and 0.4 points to 32.3%. The Coalition Avenir Québec made a small gain in the popular vote, up 0.5 points to 23.2%, but has lost two seats. They are now projected to win 16.

Québec Solidaire is down 0.2 points to 5.6% and remains at two seats. The Greens are down 0.4 points to 1.6% while Option Nationale is down 0.5 points to 0.5%.

The polls have tightened up considerably throughout Quebec, shrinking the projection ranges as well. This has had an important effect on the potential results, as the CAQ's high range no longer overlaps with the low ranges of the PQ and Liberals. The PQ is now projected to win between 50 and 75 seats, putting them in a very good position to come out ahead. The Liberals are projected to win between 30 and 54 seats, making a Liberal plurality highly unlikely. And with between 10 and 28 seats, the CAQ forming the Official Opposition, or even heading up a weak minority government, is out of the question.

The Parti Québécois has made gains in most parts of the province, but primarily in and around Montreal. On the island there have been no changes in seats, but the PQ is up three points to 30.2%. That still puts them well behind the Liberals, who lead with 42.3% (+0.7) in the projection, but the PQ is currently at their floor in terms of seats. They have room to grow, while the Liberals are at the high end of their capabilities. Québec Solidaire has moved back into third on the island, with a 0.3-point gain to hit 11.9%.

In the suburbs off of the island of Montreal, the PQ is up 2.9 points in the projection to 38.8%, awarding them four new seats. The Liberals are down 0.7 points and two seats to 28.3%, while the CAQ dropped 2.5 points to 25.8%, and two seats to only four.

The PQ also made gains at both ends of the province, picking up 2.8 points in western Quebec and 3.2 points in eastern Quebec, in all giving them three more seats. In eastern Quebec, the PQ leads with 46.8% and is trailed by the Liberals at 29.3% (-2.8). The Liberals are down three seats, two of them going to the PQ and one to the CAQ, which is up 1.3 points to 18.1% in the region.

In western Quebec, the PQ leads with 41.9% and is trailed by the Liberals at 28.1% (-1.8) and the CAQ at 21.8% (-1.8).

The Liberals did improve their standing in Quebec City, however. They are up three points to 36.1%, widening the gap between them and the CAQ. François Legault's party is up 0.8 points to 33.6%, but the Liberal gain has given them an extra seat. They are projected to win six to the CAQ's four and the PQ's one (they slipped 1.2 points to 23.3%).

The CAQ also saw their fortunes improve in central Quebec, as the party picked up 3.7 points to hit 29% and six seats, a gain of one. The Liberals dropped 0.5 points to 29.4%, giving them a very narrow edge over the CAQ, but they also dropped one seat to only two. At 34.6%, the PQ leads (though they dropped 0.6 points).

Worrisome for the Liberals is that they have fallen to third in the polls in certain regions. The projection adjusts polling results slightly, but in terms of the unadjusted average the PLQ now trails the CAQ for second place in central Quebec and the Montreal suburbs, and has fallen from first to second in Quebec City. The superior electoral machinery of the Liberals, however, should be able to make the difference.
Forum's latest poll for The National Post generally shows the status quo from the polling firm's perspective, as no party has seen its support shift to a statistically significant degree. The PQ has widened their lead (and it is a lead just outside the margin of error) to four points, picking up one point to hit 35% while the Liberals dropped one to 31%. The CAQ slipped one point to 25%, while Québec Solidaire was steady at 6%.

None of the regional variations appear to be important, suggesting that voting intentions in the province are generally solid. The PQ holds a statistically significant lead on the south shore and among francophones, however, while the Liberals are well ahead among non-francophones.

Even the approval/disapproval ratings of the leaders has not shifted more than a wink. If anything has occurred, however, it is that every leader has seen their disapproval ratings move up a tick or two.

Forum includes a question on whether voters are enthusiastic or not to cast their ballot, a possible proxy for people who are likely to vote. There isn't a huge difference in voter enthusiasm between the parties, but the PQ does have the edge. If we look at the "very enthusiastic" totals, we get a vote share of 39% for the PQ, 31% for the Liberals, and 22% for the CAQ.

Three riding polls have also been released over the last week, all by Segma Recherche. The first, for the riding of Granby, found the CAQ at 49% to 24% for the PQ and 16% for the Liberals. This was very close to the projection at the time, which gave the CAQ 49% to 23% for the PQ and Liberals.

Two polls today in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region found the PQ in good standing, as the projection did. The PQ scored 59% in Lac-Saint-Jean and 53% in Chicoutimi, and were trailed by the Liberals and CAQ in a close tie for second. The Liberals had 21% in Chicoutimi and 17% in Lac-Saint-Jean, while the CAQ had 19% and 18%, respectively. The projection did give the PQ a wide margin of victory, but interestingly it was over-estimating Liberal support, mostly to the detriment of the CAQ.

The Liberals were also over-estimated in Granby and Sherbrooke. This leads to two questions: is the projection over-estimating Liberal support? Or, are polls under-estimating their vote? If the projection is over-estimating the Liberals, this could have one of two consequences. On the one hand, it may be over-estimating the Liberal ability to win seats. On the other hand, it may be under-estimating Liberal support where they have incumbents. This occurred in the Alberta election, where the Liberal vote tanked disproportionately in ridings where they did not have an incumbent, and held firm in ridings where they did. There was no sign of that in the riding poll for Sherbrooke, though.

But if the polls are under-estimating Liberal support we could see them be much stronger than expected on election night. This is what the projection model assumes with its adjustment mechanism for turnout, but there is always the possibility that the incumbency advantage will be especially strong in this election.

20 comments:

  1. This wholly surprises me. I expected the PQ vote to continue to dwindle along with, but perhaps not at the same rate as, the PLQ vote in favour of CAQ.

    I suppose these will remain steady until either a gaffe happens or the debates where Pauline will find herself to be very vulnerable along with Charest.

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    1. I expected this too, honestly. I almost sure the anglophones will be in favour of the CAQ after while.

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  2. Do we have any idea on how much of the Quebec population would be voting Yes on a possible referendum should the PQ come out on top with a majority?

    I know they almost aren't speaking of this at all at the moment as it would be political suicide, but I'm almost certain that it would resurface if they get a majority.

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    1. Support generally oscillates somewhere between 35% and 45%, depending on the poll. Lately, it has been on the lower side.

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    2. I think in this election a vote the PQ is not a vote for sovereignty. It is a vote against Charest. My feeling is that even among Québec Liberals, federalists, soft federalists there is a high dissatisfaction with Charest. Unfortunately there are really no other party for which these people can vote other than a separtist party, CAQ or PVQ. And the new progressive,federalist party Union citoyenne du Québec (UCQ) is still too new and unknown to register on most voters radar. I also think that if Marois tries to spin a PQ majority or minority into a referendum it will backfire on her.

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    3. Claude,
      Éric,

      Bingo!

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  3. Éric, is there any chance you might elaborate further on how you get from the poll averages to the vote projection beyond "taking into account past discrepancies between voting intentions and voting results"? This seems to result in the PQ and PLQ outperforming their polling numbers and all others underperforming. However, looking at the 2008 results vs. the polls, I'm not fully seeing these tendencies. Definitely the Greens and QS underperformed, but the PLQ sort of did as well: most polls throughout the campaign had them in the 44-46% range, whereas they ended up with 42%, exactly as predicted by that final Angus Reid poll on Dec 5. Meanwhile, the ADQ (assuming you may be using them as a proxy for the CAQ) at 16% did better than any poll had shown (12-15%) throughout the whole campaign. Finally, while the PQ (35%) did outperform a number of polls throughout the campaign, that same Angus Reid one had them at 36% and Environics had them as high as 39% near the beginning of the campaign. Just curious. Cheers.

    Dom

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    1. There are links to the methodology in the side-bar.

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    2. Hadn't noticed that! Thanks.

      Dom

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  4. I'm surprise so far. The PQ's campaing is the weakest of the three majors. Charest is going slowly, but without any major mistake. And the CAQ is going firm with the marketing adage; everyone talk about them.

    All in all, this bunch of poll, well I think they do their classical trick, not showing uncertain voter. From memory, every time they did that, they really over-estimated, and by a lot, the PQ.

    Just to say, as I can observe directly the campaign, that do not feel like the real shift. Time will tell, or 4th September, whatever come first.

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    1. The PQ's campaign is not really the weakest, it is the most traditional and predictable. They make no gaffes and do their own thing while the Liberals and the CAQ pile on gaffe after gaffe and get involved in mud-slinging. The PQ's campaign is not likely to yield a great breakthrough, but they don't need it, they're ahead and they don't want to create too much turbulence.

      The Liberals by far are doing the worst campaign. They're extremely negative, which has backfired until now and the public trust in them is basically gone, which seriously weakens their arguments and big promises. The problem with the Liberals is that they have no more link to the francophone voters, people don't feel like the Liberals listen to them or are on their side. Their arrogance and attempts to demonstrate their authority are not helping at all.

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  5. The Quebec electorate is notoriously volatile. It will be interesting to see if this holds until September or if support will now rally behind either the PLQ or CAQ as a consequence of the PQ gaining.

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    1. A lot of people in Quebec like the fact that the PQ is gaining. Quebec nationalists are especially loyal to seperatist parties and will have no trouble getting out their vote at all. Remember the fact that non-francophones are a minority in Quebec, and francophones are in the majority, that should put the huge liberal lead among non-francophones into perspective.

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  6. I thought I submitted a comment on this earlier: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Marois+struggling+with+hijab+backlash/7094413/story.html

    Did you censor it out Eric, or did it just not go through?

    On that story itself... if the PQ keeps rising in the polls thanks to bigotry like that, then it will be a sad reminder that politicians can and will exploit the more hateful instincts of people for their own partisan gain.

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  7. Despite ideological differences, Pauline Marois reminds me of Danielle Smith.

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  8. Pauline Marois reminds me more of Marine Le Pen - actually if you look at pictures of them side by side Marois could be Le Pen's mother!

    You say Quebec voters are notoriously "volatile". Compared to who?? Compared to Alberta voters who swung wildly in their election? Compared to Ontario voters who looked ready to dump the Liberals and then swung wildly back and forth?

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  9. The new CROP poll is intriguing... not sure if Éric is going to do a write up about it.

    August 14
    PQ- 34%
    PLQ- 27%
    CAQ- 25%
    QS- 7%
    PVQ- 3%
    ON- 2%

    The PLQ is finally starting to take a hit, with CAQ surging four points since the last CROP poll. It will be interesting to see what the debates do to these numbers.

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  10. Éric, has CROP released the details from its poll today? It's apparently showing a sizeable (though not yet statistically significant) switch of non-francophone support to the CAQ, with 20% supporting the. I don't think it'll have much effect on your projection though, because the numbers are pretty much spot on with what you have 34 PQ, 27 PLQ, 25 CAQ

    Cheers,

    Vince

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  11. An update with CROP's numbers is coming later this afternoon.

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    1. Thanks! Your site is a fantastic resource, by the way.

      Vince

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